Three Digigrams

Barbara Henning

Three Digigrams 2017-09-25T15:29:51+00:00

Project Description

Oct 27, 2016

—on the subway—a tall young man standing over me—baseball hat—headphones—fine curved upper arms—his head grazes the ceiling—bending the cost curve—essential for long term well-being—the train leans left—a woman leans over—to adjust the strap—on one of her heels—perhaps—the possibility of coupling—swiped away—early on—headphones can be worn—as a necklace—with only a hint of a head and tail—the common swift—curves its wings—staying in the air—for ten months—this or that haircut—and bang—you’re an old man—don’t even think—about a tank top—a kind of mental framework—takes hold—I’m worried—about a friend—her hands shaking—her hands rigid—even though—it’s cold and rainy—I wear a skirt—the young man wears a tee-shirt—and Glen Close—tones her bones and sinews—on Sunset Boulevard—let’s all just pretend—it’s warm outside—

Dec 1, 2016

          for Nevine Michaan and Charles Blow

—the body’s organized—on a square—so says Yogi Nevine—I walk around Tompkins Square—all four corners—surely this is the center—of the universe—the goal in life—should be joy—in Larung Gar—the Chinese—are tearing apart—Tibetan monastic—dwellings—plan your life—like a chess game—move analytically—with intent—it’s very practical—the way to attain joy—even for civilians—trapped in Aleppo—with artillery shelling overhead—defeat in life—is bitterness—buck up—writes Charles Blow—it’s over—the bully’s—in the white house—for the time being—alt-right is not—a computer command—they’re a batch of fanatical racists—if you’re happy—you’ll help everyone—if you’re miserable—you won’t help anyone—in Shuafat—a refugee camp—in Jerusalem—Baha helps the orphans—work, find direction, survive—then a drive-by—ten bullets—one of the children—will surely—take his place—you can follow—fake news sites—from one to another—unravel the molecular structure—of ribosomes—a tangled mess of rubber bands—and coiled wires—a new pattern—of income equality—life expectancy in the US—declines slightly—be careful—it’s like a string ball—if we keep going around—in the same direction—we will surely unravel—

Jan 20, 2017

—a man in the airport—kicks a woman—wearing a head scarf—the bully will get rid of all of you—across from Rikers—people take photos of a family of Coyotes with eight pups—as if on a safari—I could meditate—instead like a squirrel weaving green twigs—the owner  of superiority burger edgy—too many hours—I know—a copy center in Brooklyn—traveling with carnivals—lemonade stand—a camera booth—in art fairs—drove an ice cream truck—ran a contentious English department—nothing quite as dramatic—however—as Clare Hollingworth—a war correspondent—at 80 shinnying up a lamppost—in Tiananmen Square—dying at 105—an incredible life—kudos to Ms. Hollingworth—I jog around the square—trees bare—around the corner on Avenue A—just a whiff of smoke and I’m coughing—then running toward 1st Avenue for apples and oranges—

Barbara Henning

Born in Detroit in 1948, Barbara Henning moved to New York City in 1983. In 2005 Barbara took an early retirement from Long Island University and moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico briefly and then to Tucson, Arizona where she taught for the University of Arizona, and for the Poetry Center, serving on the board of the literary group POG and Chax Press. In 2010 she returned New York where she presently lives. She’s a board member of the Belladonna Collaborative and the author of three novels and nine collections of poetry.

Her most recent books are a book of poetry, A Day Like Today (Negative Capability Press 2015); two collections of poetry and prose, A Swift Passage (Quale Press, 2013) and Cities & Memory (Chax Press, 2010); a novel, Thirty Miles from Rosebud (BlazeVox, 2009); a collection of object-sonnets, My Autobiography (United Artists, 2007). She is also the author/editor of a book of interviews, Looking Up Harryette Mullen (Belladonna, 2011), and The Selected Prose of Bobbie Louise Hawkins (Blazevox, 2012).

For a number of years she published limited editions of a series of 16 photo-poem pamphlets, distributed to a list of poets. She is a long-time yoga practitioner, having lived and studied in Mysore, India with Shankaranarayana Jois, and she brings this knowledge and discipline to her writing and her teaching at Naropa University (2006-14), writers.com and Long Island University in Brooklyn, where she is Professor Emerita.

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